Wooden: A Coach’s Life

Today I have the pleasure of bringing you a particularly special post. For my second book of the 2015 Reading Challenge, I chose Seth Davis’s Wooden: A Coach’s Life, which details the life of renowned basketball coach John Wooden. It’s a genre I don’t normally read (sports biography*), but the reason I picked this particular book is because my very own brother assisted Davis with the extensive amount of research for it.

*It could also have fallen under the category “a book my mom loves.” See above.

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In case you’re not as completely obsessed with college basketball as my family is, John Wooden is remembered as one of the greatest coaches in the history of the game, if not the single greatest. He began as the son of a simple farmer in Indiana in the early 20th century, when the sport of basketball was still very young. He quickly fostered a love and a great skill for it and moved from playing in high school, college, and professionally to coaching high school and college ball himself. That career eventually brought him out to the west coast when he took the head coaching job at UCLA in 1948, and he never looked back. In 27 seasons with the Bruins, he led them to ten NCAA championships as well as several regional and conference championships. Coming from a family with a love of sports and a long legacy at UCLA, it was only fitting that my brother would spend his summers (and more) working on this book while a student at UCLA himself.

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I’m a proud sister.

I never had a chance to meet Seth Davis while my brother was working with him, but I can imagine from his writing style what a fun person he must be to work for. I’m not the hugest lover of sports in my family (the bar is set quite high), but I loved reading this book (even though it took me well over two months to read… it’s incredibly dense with information). Davis includes tons of interesting anecdotes about Wooden, his family, his players, and the world of the midwestern U.S. in the early 20th century. I especially enjoyed reading about various important basketball games throughout Wooden’s career and picturing them happening play by play. As I’m watching this year’s March Madness tournament, I keep thinking about the descriptions of the various games in the book and seeing them play out as if I were watching them on TV.

More importantly, though, is the picture of Wooden as a complete individual. Though Davis makes it pretty clear that Wooden was no saint, he also gives credit where it’s due, and it certainly is due. His contributions to basketball in general, college basketball in particular, and UCLA history especially, are an amazing legacy that have affected millions, my own family included.

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2015 Reading Challenge

Reading more books is always at the top of the New Year’s resolution list. It’s right up there with “work out more” or “get organized” or “travel to three new countries.” Last year I set myself a Goodreads challenge to read twenty books, and I didn’t quite make it. I’ll be trying for that same number again this year, but in addition, I’ll be participating in the 2015 Reading Challenge from Modern Mrs. Darcy.

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I’ve already kicked off the year by starting Gone Girl, which definitely falls under the category of “everyone has read it but me,” and I can’t wait for the fun of choosing a book to fit each criteria. Some of them can probably be accomplished with one book (for example, my mom is probably my #1 book recommender, which fits two different categories), but I’m going to try to allow just one category per book. Many, many reviews to come!

Would you consider joining this particular challenge?