Tamale Making

Every February for the past five years, our church has sent a team of people to Mexico for a week to work at an orphanage called Rancho Santa Marta. It’s a very successful trip each year because of the variety of projects available for people of all ages and skill levels. I’ve never been, but T is going for the first time this year, along with several of our youth group kids and many other multi-generational volunteers.

It costs a bit of money for each person to go on the trip, so in order to lower the cost for everyone, we do a fundraiser in January where we make and sell tamales by the dozen. We have one family in our church who are all expert tamale makers, and every year they coach the rest of us through the process of making them. It’s pretty simple, so even some of the younger kids in the church can come help out.

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Some of the leaders showing us all how it’s done.

To make tamales, there are a few items you need:

  • Masa, or tamale dough (plenty of recipes available online)
  • Some sort of pre-cooked meat (we used pork)
  • Corn husks (the bigger the better)
  • Plastic gloves (it gets messy)

The first thing to do is create a small pancake of masa on top of a corn husk. You want it to be thin, but it should cover about the upper 2/3 of the husk. Then place a small-ish amount of meat in the middle of the masa. You can spread it out a little, but not all the way to the edges.

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It should look something like this.

Once you’ve put the meat in, fold the whole thing in half or in thirds, making sure the masa seals on the open edge. Fold up the bottom (pointy end) of the corn husk and push the masa and meat towards the top, but don’t let it come all the way out.

After that, the tamales have to steam for a while. Food and Wine recommends an hour and a half, but I don’t think our cooks did it for that long. So sue me, I was helping with the preparation, not the actual cooking.

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Students working.

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More students (and T) working.

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A tortilla press, which you can use to make the masa flat and even on the husk.

It's a messy process.

It’s a messy process.

Pan full of assembled (but not yet steamed) tamales.

Pan full of assembled (but not yet steamed) tamales.

One of our students hard at work making it just right.

One of our students hard at work making it just right.

We sold the tamales in bags by the dozen, with instructions for reheating at home. Of course, T and I bought two bags, one of which was completely gone within 24 hours. They are always so delicious, and we raised a good chunk of money toward the Rancho Santa Marta trip.

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The finished product.

And they are even more enjoyable as a consumer!

And they are even more enjoyable as a consumer!

Have you ever made tamales before?

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